Saturday, May 23, 2020

Artistic and Intellectual Developments in Japan and Europe...

In the late 18th century both Japan and Europe were experiencing many new artistic and intellectual developments. While Europe’s developments were increasingly political, more and more people wanted rights for women along with protection from the state. Japan on the other hand was progressively modernizing from their isolated feudal society into its modern form now. Beginning in Tokyo many new intellectual advances came from studying the western sciences and techniques. Authors like Rousseau and Wollstonecraft wrote revolutionary books in Europe that changed the way people thought about themselves and what rights they should be born with; they led people to question the state and fight for what they believed to be justifiably right. In†¦show more content†¦He depicted citizens having power over their own lives and getting a chance to have a say in what effects them rather than having a monarch tell them when and how something should be done. With this new social contract citizens have a voice and have a form of protection from the state. Throughout this century, as more and more intellectual developments occur the increase in education becomes more important than ever. Thankfully the Enlightenment period and the French Revolution brought along with them the development of the educational system. The new forms of printing lead to an increase of available books which overall produced a larger reading public. At one point of time education was only a privilege of the upper class, but as the 18th century rolled in and changes were made education became available to all classes. As Europe continued to advance surrounding countries like japan would try to copy and recreate the same types of evolution in their country to keep up with the rest of the world, some the same and others not so much. Japan at the turn of the century was clearly trying to westernize and change is isolated society into one more intellectually and scientifically involved with the rest of the world. When the Japanese open their ports to the western civilization food and merchandise were not the only things being traded. When ports were open the western way of living was integrated with the Japanese culture which gradually changed the way theShow MoreRelatedThe Spread of Buddhism Essay1149 Words   |  5 Pagesteachings. But they, too, encouraged disagreements, so that one group after another left the fold. Ultimately, 18 schools developed, each with their own interpretations of various issues, and spread all over India and Southeast Asia. A significant development happened at the same time as the Buddhist movement began to spread and that was the opening of a new way through, from India to China. Today, we call this way the Silk Road, and we associate it with famous travelers like Marco Polo, whose journeysRead MoreIndustrial Revolution Essay1189 Words   |  5 Pages Several major events in Europe have affected the way of life for people all over the world. First, the Industrial Revolution is very important. As briefly discussed in Question One, the Industrial Revolution was a time when steam-powered machines and factories came into view instead of just agriculture. The Industrial Revolution brought many things. First, machines and systems were made to replace traditional farming, this meant fewer people were needed on farms which results in more jobs beingRead MoreComparison of the Renaissance and Enlightenment.3470 Words   |  14 Pagesit: the Black Death, economic, political and social crises. For the intel lectuals, it was a period of recovery from the Dark Ages; a period, which was called so due to its lack of classical culture. First Italian and then intellectuals of the rest of Europe became increasingly interested in the Greco-Roman culture of the ancient Mediterranean world. This interest was fostered especially by the migration of the Greek intellectuals during the Middle Ages and the fact that the ancient Greek works couldRead MoreHst276 Week 42234 Words   |  9 Pageslocated on plains and surrounded by new honshu that supplied their needs. Toyotomi Hideyoshi succeeded in reuniting all of toyotomi island, and his successor, hidetsugo , completed the reunification of Japan in 1600, ending the Warring States era. Civilization of Tokugawa-Era Japan a. Tokugawa Ieyasu took for himself the title in 1603 and established a new bakufu based in , present-day Tokyo. Ieyasu confiscated the territory of his enemies and transferredRead MoreWeek 4 Hist 276 Essay2444 Words   |  10 Pagessurrounded by new towns that supplied their needs. Toyotomi Hideyoshi succeeded in reuniting all of Honshu island, and his successor, Tokugawa Ieyasu , completed the reunification of Japan in 1600, ending the Warring States era. Civilization of Tokugawa-Era Japan a. Tokugawa Ieyasu took for himself the title of shÃ… gun in 1603 and established a new bakufu based in Edo , present-day Tokyo. Ieyasu confiscated the territory of his enemiesRead MoreA Semi-Brief History of the Visual Narrative2279 Words   |  10 Pagestransect the pages of history, excluding none. Here in the digital age, the surrounding environment continues to become more and more visually-infested, nearly keeping pace with the rapid development of communications technology. In such a world, the problem of how words and pictures connect is a vital one. And no artistic medium seems to me as properly suited to the working out of the connection as the visual narrative is. It is itself the meeting ground of words and pictures (Dardess 222). From theRead MoreThe Origins of Occidentalism2305 Words   |  10 Pages To answer the question posed it necessary to first consider the development of, and what constitutes the West. Once this is achieved, we are than able to discuss occidentalism. However, the concept of orientalism, and what constitutes the orient, will first be considered as, arguably, orientalism provoked occidentalism. Thereafter, the four key features of occidentalism, identified by Buruma and Margalit (2004) will be discussed. Contemporary notions of ociddentalism, more specifically IslamicRead MoreSchools of Art in Different Places of India Establish by the British Empire2757 Words   |  12 PagesThe approach of Britishers towards Indian art played an important role in the development of the process of the formal training of Indian artists so Britishers started to establish art schools in the major cities of India. One of the main reason of opening art schools in India was Britishers found that Indi an artists had insufficiency in the scientific knowledge of art and were less able to create natural landscapes. Another reason was the demand for Indian luxury crafts by the British public inRead More The Japanese Entertainment Industry Essay4213 Words   |  17 Pagesplan instituted by the United States, Japan was without surplus resources. There was no money for the production of films. American films soon began invading the Japanese entertainment industry. Yet the Japanese people longed for entertainment which would reflect their own culture. And so â€Å"animation...developed in Japan to fill the void of high-budget film-making† (Marin, 69). In the years that followed, animation would take a pop-cultural foothold in Japan that has grown and transformed, and yetRead MoreLvmh Report7586 Words   |  31 Pagesdimensions of the macro environment by use of the PESTEL framework and the luxury industry by the Five forces framework. The global economy, people s expectations on luxury goods, drive for technological application, rarity of raw materials, and intellectual property laws all have an impact on LVMH in a broad sense. In a narrower sense, market entry into the luxury sector is defined low, threat of substitutes neutral (low to loyal customers but high to those who normally cannot afford), the power of

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Aboriginal Self-Government in Canada Essay - 982 Words

The question that is brought up is not that of sex, but it is that of aboriginals in Canada. The question that is asked is should there be an aboriginal self-government? If the government were to go ahead and give the natives there own government they would be losing money and would most likely have angry taxpayers after their asses for the rest of there sorry political lives. The government would also have to deal with a swarm of Quebecans that would be harassing them because of their decision to give the natives their own government, because of their 1995 appeal to separate from Canada. The Quebecans would believe that if the natives get what they want, they should also get what they want. That would mean that Quebec would separate†¦show more content†¦At least theyll think that they will. Either way the government will have to put up with the whining of the disrupted natives. There is still a pretty good chance that the natives will leave the government alone for a while. After the years of complaining and fighting, the natives got what they want. Hopefully theyll be happy with what the government gave them and not fight for any more rights, because they have enough already.As mentioned in the first paragraph, giving the natives their own government would cause the government of Canada to lose a lot of money that can be used for other useful needs, such as spending the money on something more useful, such as education, which there isnt enough spent on. Maybe the government could even think about putting some more money into health care and give the less-fortunate people a chance to receive medical help when needed instead of them not wanting to go a physician because of the amount of money needed to attend one. The Canadian government is always complaining about how theyre in debt and cant afford to accomplish certain goals they promised to achieve. Well I dont see them turning down the request to give the natives their own government, which will cost the government a few dollars. The government should also maybe consider the fact that there other things out in Canada that needShow MoreRelatedSteps to Improving the Socioeconomic Conditions of the Aboriginal Population in Canada1177 Words   |  5 PagesThe aboriginal people live in reserves that are rich in minerals like oil and gas. Their traditional beliefs cannot allow them to benefit from an economic venture like mining. They believe that Mother Nature should and needs to be protected. In a bid to do so, they have rules against exploitation of nature like modern mining. This puts their traditional values at odds with economical developments like mining. This leaves them in a dilapidated state as poverty kicks in (Wilson and Macdonald, 2000)Read MoreYouth Suicide Rates Among Aboriginal Youth1278 Words   |  6 Pagesamongst Aboriginal youth are five to seven times higher than non-Aboriginal youth, and Inuit youth are among the highest in the world, at 11 times the national average, there are several contr ibuting attributes that should be further researched. (Health Canada, 2013) One of the contributing factors that are discussed in many Aboriginal courses is that of identity. Aboriginal youth who face high levels of intergenerational trauma due to the RS system often find themselves distanced from Aboriginal cultureRead MoreThe Aboriginal Quality Of Life Within Canada1259 Words   |  6 Pages When discussing the Aboriginal quality of life within Canada there are several issues that come to mind, such as health, education, housing and our Canadian-Indigenous relationship (First Ministers And National Aboriginal Leaders, 2005, p. 1). However, many times Canadians neglect to distinguish the root of the issue. While residential schools may be addressed and looked upon historically, the traumas and effects are still particularly palpable for many Indigenous communities. For this reason, itRead MoreAboriginals: the Mistreated Minorites of Canada1051 Words   |  5 PagesAboriginal peop le are very passionate about their culture and traditions and believe that they are an important part of Canada’s past. Although their customs shaped Canada into a great nation, they are slowly fading into the background while competing with the French and English cultures. â€Å"Such an understanding gives no consideration to the presence and role of Aboriginal groups throughout history.† First Nation’s people do not receive a just amount of respect and equality in terms of their rightsRead MoreA Free And Democratic Society782 Words   |  4 Pagessociety, one of the fundamental principles is that people should be treated in a manner that is fair and equitable. A peace-loving liberal democracy such as Canada intends to apply the rule of law to all of its citizens. For most social and political issues, this is the case; a social need is often followed by a solution from the government that has equitable and fair applications. Historically, the marginaliz ation of minority groups has been a pressing and contentious issue within the countryRead MoreOver The Past Years, Canadian Courts Have Repeatedly Urged1644 Words   |  7 Pagesthat aboriginal title conflicts should be resolved through negotiation, rather than litigation. The primary reason being that litigation is costly and time-consuming. For example, the decision for the Delgamuukw case took a duration of thirteen years. Furthermore, litigations that deal with the issue of aboriginal rights and title are â€Å"generally narrowly focused† and â€Å"ultimately leaves the question [posed about] how aboriginal rights and title apply unwarned.† For instance, the courts of Canada repeatedlyRead MoreThe Government s Efforts For The Indigenous Peoples Of Canada1591 Words   |  7 Pagesbetween Aboriginal Peoples and European immigrants to the present day, the aim of Canadian government policy has been to assimilate the Indigenous Peoples of Canada. The attempted forced abandonment of their culture was perpetrated through a variety of strategies including force, aggression and legalities. While historians and politicians may disagree about the motivations of Canadian policy, the impact has been irrefutable. In efforts to create one unified nation, successive governments failed toRead MoreFactors That May Be Responsible For Aboriginal Suicide1281 Words   |  6 PagesAboriginal people represent less than 3% of the total population in BC. Yet, they account for more than 9% of all suicides in BC (Chandler). The numbers of suicides amongst aboriginal youth are even more alarming – nearly one-fourth of all youth suicides in BC are committed by aboriginals and more than half of all aboriginal suicides are committed by youth (Chandler). The fact that indigenous communities in Canada have the highest rate of suicide of any culturally identifiable group in the worldRead MoreThe Indian Act Of Aboriginal Affairs1633 Words   |  7 Pagesgoverned almo st all aspects of Aboriginal life, from the nature of band governance and land tenure systems to restrictions on Aboriginal cultural practices. Most critically, the Indian Act defines the qualifications for being a â€Å"status Indian,† and as such has been the centerpiece of Aboriginal anger over federal attempts to control Aboriginal identity and membership. Since being passed by Parliament in 1876, the Indian Act has been the touchstone for Aboriginal affairs in Canada. Few documents in CanadianRead MoreWhy is it Difficult to Define an Aboriginal Person?1336 Words   |  5 PagesAboriginal peoples occupied Canadian lands long before the country was established and yet their position within Canadian hierarchy is often questioned. Colonialism imposed Euro-Canadian standards on First Nations peoples, challenging socio-cultural traditions and norms in the process. The implications of this decision propagate a longstanding marginalization of Aboriginal people, which is still e xperienced today (Frideres and Gasacz 1). Historical circumstances have created an unbalanced dichotomy

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Drivers of Foreign Policy Free Essays

Since the peaceful coup that brought the current emir of Qatar, Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, to power in 1995, Qatar has entered into an increasingly expanding foreign policy, which has greatly increased the country’s regional and international standing. The main feature of Qatar’s foreign policy is its role as mediator and negotiator in a number of conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere, for example in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Iraq, Israel and the occupied territories, Lebanon, Sudan and Yemen. In each case, Qatar prided itself on engaging with warring factions to push for political settlements or rapprochement, as well as providing humanitarian assistance. We will write a custom essay sample on Drivers of Foreign Policy or any similar topic only for you Order Now The decisions governing Qatar’s participation in such conflicts are very central. The main decision-makers are the Emir, His Highness Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Al-Thani. Restricting much of the decision-making of this small circle has quickly led to foreign (and local) policy decisions, allowing Qatar to respond quickly to emerging conflicts with mediation offers. While it can be said that drawing a picture of the country as a benefactor is a public diplomatic move by Qatar – since neutrality facilitates the consolidation of credibility among multiple audiences – there are deeper motives behind Qatar’s expansionist approach to mediating the conflict by expanding its foreign policy. The first motive is to maintain its security and stability. Qatar is located in the Arabian Peninsula, an area full of political and military rivalries. By increasing its international standing, Qatar aims to protect itself from the dangers of non-disclosure of small and vulnerable states 5 – risks of the type suffered by Kuwait in 1990. 6 In addition, by engaging in mediation between conflicting factions such as Houthis and the Yemeni government. Or between Hezbollah and its allies on the one hand and the March 14 bloc on the other, Qatar can be seen as trying to contain those conflicts and prevent their spread closer to home. This inevitability becomes more acute when one considers the role Iran plays in those conflicts and in the Gulf in particular. Iran is the main backer of Hezbollah and has established links with the Huthis in Yemen and a number of Shiite movements in the Gulf. Qatar also shares the largest oil field in the world with Iran, and is fully aware of Iran’s expansionist foreign policy objectives in the region. By trying to mediate between non-Iranian actors and their rivals, Qatar is trying to counter Iranian influence in the Middle East in general, and more specifically in the Gulf, while maintaining friendly relations with Iran. Thus, in addition to general security concerns, Iran’s role in the region can be seen as a clear driver behind Qatar’s mediation of the Middle East conflict. The third motive for Qatari mediation is the desire to expand its influence as a regional player, especially in the face of Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia has traditionally played a leading role in conflicts throughout the region, for example during the Lebanese civil war. However, in recent years Saudi mediation has been spoiled for perceived neutrality, making the Kingdom an active player rather than a neutral intermediary. The close relationship between Saudi Arabia and the March 14 political bloc in Lebanon, led by Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, is an example. Qatar therefore viewed a vacuum in the Arab international relations it was trying to bridge. Its involvement in conflicts across the Middle East and beyond is an effort to present itself as a vital alternative to Saudi Arabia and a potential new leader in the Middle East. This role was further enhanced by Qatar’s membership of the United Nations Security Council in 2006-2007, during which the Emirate increased its regional mediation and assistance activities. However, Qatar was keen not to exceed the limits of its relationship with Saudi Arabia. Despite Qatar’s view of Saudi Arabia’s low influence in the Middle East (in addition to the growing Iranian influence, which adds to the urgent need for regional Arab leadership), the country remains cautious not to conflict with the kingdom’s domestic and foreign policies. Thus, when the Bahraini uprising began in 2011, Qatar supported the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) – led by Saudi Arabia – mission to quell the insurgency. 7 When the Yemeni uprising, which began in the same year, gained momentum, Qatar also supported the GCC initiative it managed. The path of transition in Yemen, leading to a negotiated transition instead of overthrowing the regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh. Although Qatar’s relationship with Saudi Arabia over the years has been turbulent, it has finally reached a rapprochement in 2008 and has continued to become more entrenched, driven by Qatari realism and the Emirate’s awareness of the limits of its influence in the Gulf. Saudi Arabia is the dominant political power in the Arabian Peninsula, where Qatar has not yet had the opportunity or the ability to play the first major role. Both countries share concerns about the instability and political transition that are reaching their territory, which leads them to cooperate more than confrontation. How to cite Drivers of Foreign Policy, Papers

Drivers of Foreign Policy Free Essays

Since the peaceful coup that brought the current emir of Qatar, Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, to power in 1995, Qatar has entered into an increasingly expanding foreign policy, which has greatly increased the country’s regional and international standing. The main feature of Qatar’s foreign policy is its role as mediator and negotiator in a number of conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere, for example in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Iraq, Israel and the occupied territories, Lebanon, Sudan and Yemen. In each case, Qatar prided itself on engaging with warring factions to push for political settlements or rapprochement, as well as providing humanitarian assistance. We will write a custom essay sample on Drivers of Foreign Policy or any similar topic only for you Order Now The decisions governing Qatar’s participation in such conflicts are very central. The main decision-makers are the Emir, His Highness Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Al-Thani. Restricting much of the decision-making of this small circle has quickly led to foreign (and local) policy decisions, allowing Qatar to respond quickly to emerging conflicts with mediation offers. While it can be said that drawing a picture of the country as a benefactor is a public diplomatic move by Qatar – since neutrality facilitates the consolidation of credibility among multiple audiences – there are deeper motives behind Qatar’s expansionist approach to mediating the conflict by expanding its foreign policy. The first motive is to maintain its security and stability. Qatar is located in the Arabian Peninsula, an area full of political and military rivalries. By increasing its international standing, Qatar aims to protect itself from the dangers of non-disclosure of small and vulnerable states 5 – risks of the type suffered by Kuwait in 1990. 6 In addition, by engaging in mediation between conflicting factions such as Houthis and the Yemeni government. Or between Hezbollah and its allies on the one hand and the March 14 bloc on the other, Qatar can be seen as trying to contain those conflicts and prevent their spread closer to home. This inevitability becomes more acute when one considers the role Iran plays in those conflicts and in the Gulf in particular. Iran is the main backer of Hezbollah and has established links with the Huthis in Yemen and a number of Shiite movements in the Gulf. Qatar also shares the largest oil field in the world with Iran, and is fully aware of Iran’s expansionist foreign policy objectives in the region. By trying to mediate between non-Iranian actors and their rivals, Qatar is trying to counter Iranian influence in the Middle East in general, and more specifically in the Gulf, while maintaining friendly relations with Iran. Thus, in addition to general security concerns, Iran’s role in the region can be seen as a clear driver behind Qatar’s mediation of the Middle East conflict. The third motive for Qatari mediation is the desire to expand its influence as a regional player, especially in the face of Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia has traditionally played a leading role in conflicts throughout the region, for example during the Lebanese civil war. However, in recent years Saudi mediation has been spoiled for perceived neutrality, making the Kingdom an active player rather than a neutral intermediary. The close relationship between Saudi Arabia and the March 14 political bloc in Lebanon, led by Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, is an example. Qatar therefore viewed a vacuum in the Arab international relations it was trying to bridge. Its involvement in conflicts across the Middle East and beyond is an effort to present itself as a vital alternative to Saudi Arabia and a potential new leader in the Middle East. This role was further enhanced by Qatar’s membership of the United Nations Security Council in 2006-2007, during which the Emirate increased its regional mediation and assistance activities. However, Qatar was keen not to exceed the limits of its relationship with Saudi Arabia. Despite Qatar’s view of Saudi Arabia’s low influence in the Middle East (in addition to the growing Iranian influence, which adds to the urgent need for regional Arab leadership), the country remains cautious not to conflict with the kingdom’s domestic and foreign policies. Thus, when the Bahraini uprising began in 2011, Qatar supported the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) – led by Saudi Arabia – mission to quell the insurgency. 7 When the Yemeni uprising, which began in the same year, gained momentum, Qatar also supported the GCC initiative it managed. The path of transition in Yemen, leading to a negotiated transition instead of overthrowing the regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh. Although Qatar’s relationship with Saudi Arabia over the years has been turbulent, it has finally reached a rapprochement in 2008 and has continued to become more entrenched, driven by Qatari realism and the Emirate’s awareness of the limits of its influence in the Gulf. Saudi Arabia is the dominant political power in the Arabian Peninsula, where Qatar has not yet had the opportunity or the ability to play the first major role. Both countries share concerns about the instability and political transition that are reaching their territory, which leads them to cooperate more than confrontation. How to cite Drivers of Foreign Policy, Papers

Sunday, May 3, 2020

Drama Coursework Response to Disasters Essay Example For Students

Drama Coursework Response to Disasters Essay In the period of six hours, we have been looking at the theme, Disasters. We looked at two disasters at two diverse time periods, the titanic in 1912 and 9/11 in 2001. First we looked at the different class passengers on board the titanic in 1912 and how the passengers reacted when the ship first hit the ice burg. Using still images we made the scene, using facial expressions to explore the theme of the class on the titanic. We also used body language to show the audience and make it more obvious what class we were playing. We also explored the 9/11 attack in September 2001. We also used still images to show facial expressions and different ways to mark the moment of when the plane hit the twin towers, and how the citizens watching the towers, used different body language and facial expressions to emphasise the trauma. In the work shops, we used many different drama techniques to show the audience. how traumatic the disasters were and the situations they were in to set free from danger. The main technique that was used was still imaging. This technique was used because using still imaging you can get across to the audience how important life means too many people. It also showed us how the different classed people were treated in different situations. Another drama technique that was used during all six hours of work shops was thought tracking, this enabled the audience to get an overall idea of what the character was like and what was going through there mind at that very time. Thought tracking was also used because it helped the audience get an idea of the characters and the different feelings they had when both disasters both struck. We used thought tracking in some of our scenes to show how the different class passengers abroad the titanic, how they reacted and felt as the ship was filling with water. Additional to those techniques other dramatic techniques, we also used role play and marking the moment. We used these two because showing different scenes at the same time of the disaster can make the performance a lot more dramatic, role play emphasised the disaster a lot as we played different characters and there reactions at different situations and how they reacted to this, using facial and body expressions. Using Mark the moment, you can create a dramatic scene by using a still image at the part of the disaster or use slow motion to high light the disaster. During the six hours we were given several texts to explore to create more of an atmosphere, a better idea of what it was like to loose love ones in such horrific disasters.  The first few work shops we looked at the titanic. We looked at an extract from a play called standstill. It explored the different classes (1st, 2nd and 3rd) and how they were treated on the ship and what privileges they had. We did this by making at least 3 different still images for the different classes and portrayed the different mannerisms and types of body language and facial expressions they used to show the audience the type of atmosphere and surroundings they were in. We also looked at extracts such as waiting. For this extract we made three still images to show the different classes and how they ere reacting to the list of people that were missing from the titanic. We then developed our ideas by adding role play to our play to make it more realistic. We also had a piece of text that was written by many 1st and 3rd class people getting offered different jobs on the titanic and their family being very pleased for them. We also developed still images for this piece of text and used parrot on the shoulder to tell the audience what really was going through their minds at the time. .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 , .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .postImageUrl , .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 , .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8:hover , .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8:visited , .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8:active { border:0!important; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8:active , .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8 .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .ucaac2b2718f2cf1523a06da8fb6807b8:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Wouldn't get any education EssayWe then studied the 9/11 attack in America, we studied how the different facial reactions would be important and how body impressions would also be important, because we had to get across to the audience how devastating this was for those. First, we looked at a piece of text, when the plane was first boarding and before it had been hijacked. We then used role play to show the audience how they were thinking and we also used thought tracking to portray this. We also had to look at the impact that it caused to those who had family and friends in the world trade centre and the impact it had on their lives. We created many still images to betray these duties and then created role play of when the plane was flying into the first twin tower. We used role play to show the facial and body expressions of what life was really like to have a jumbo jet plane flying at their windows We then made three still images before the World trade centre was hit and how they reacted at first using facial and body expressions. We also used thought tracking of what was going through there minds, whether it was that the plane was flying really low and have life suddenly about blaze into smoke of whether what they looked like was more important. One text that we studied was called Requiem for Ground Zero, by Stephen Benkoff. This was part of a poem that was written about when the plane hit the tower and what happened and the images that were seen by the public standing and watching such a terrible moment in time. To betray such a horrifying time in 2001 we created 3 still images to show when; the tower was standing, the tower falling and the tower gone. We then created 3 still images of people trapped in the twin towers and showed their facial and body expressions. We then built this up by making it into a small play called Fallen. We imagined that we had to take a phone call to our loved ones and tell them what was happening and why they were phoning them. To create this image we used many drama techniques such as thought tracking to gat across to the audience what pain and emotion we were going through. In our last drama workshop we used a piece of text that had interviews of American citizens first witnessing the World Trade Centre collapsing. We first had to make at least 3 still images to get across the facial and body expressions of those who were down below watching the plane hit the first tower. To make ours a little more interesting we made a news report. We used spilt screen to show the audience that people all over New York were affected by this terrorist attack and how the first reacted. Looking at this afterwards, family and friends were very emotional towards those lost ones in such a horrific disaster. Many people left searching for loved ones, leaving posters and even searching in every hospital in New York to help find those they thought they may have lost. This was very similar to the way the titanic was left, missing people, distraught families, emotion and failure to find loved ones.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

PICOT Clinical Question Essay Example

PICOT Clinical Question Paper A clinical research question is a question posed by the nurse to identify the best treatment method in addressing patient needs (WCSU Libraries, n. d. ). Nurses use PICOT in developing clinical questions for research. The five letters in the term PICOT stand for each step that the nurse should identify while developing his or her clinical questions. P stands for â€Å"patient population†; I stands for â€Å"intervention or issue of interest†; C stands for â€Å"comparison intervention or comparison group†; O stands for â€Å"outcome†; and T stands for â€Å"time† (Arizona State University [ASU], n.  d. ). The clinical question formulated is: Do patients have less anxiety when pharmacologic agents are used preoperatively as compared to non-pharmocologic agents? The key words formed from this clinical question based on PICOT are preoperative patients (P), administration of pharmacologic agents preoperatively (I), administration of non-pharmacologic agents preoperatively (C ), and less preoperative anxiety (O). The use of time frame for this question is not applicable. The researcher used the PubMed (U. S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health) website to find relevant and valid studies that will provide supporting data in answering the clinical question. The researcher typed the keywords generated from the PICOT format in the search bar of the website which automatically generates a list of studies relevant to the keywords typed in. The researcher then browsed through the list of studies that appeared per keyword and analyzed whether the titles of the research studies displayed are relevant or not. We will write a custom essay sample on PICOT Clinical Question specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on PICOT Clinical Question specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on PICOT Clinical Question specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer After choosing titles of research studies that are relevant, the researcher moved on to reading the abstracts of the studies. From the chosen relevant studies, the relevance of the provided related citations from PubMed were also analyzed by the researcher. Most of the resulting related studies only compare use of pharmacologic agents and placebo in reducing preoperative anxiety. Hence, the researcher modified some of the keywords to â€Å"non phamacologic agents in preoperative anxiety,† and â€Å"less anxiety preoperatively. † These search keywords generated studies and articles that address the clinical question (see Appendix). One study entitled, â€Å"Premedication in children: Hypnosis versus Midazolam,† is a randomized clinical trial conducted on 50 pediatric patients aged 2-11 years old. The patients were divided into two groups and received different interventions prior to surgery. One group was subject to hypnosis (non-pharmacologic) and the other group received Midazolam (pharmacologic). The patients preoperative anxiety level were assessed through the Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS) and postoperative behavior assessed through Posthospitalization Behavioral Questionnaire (PHBQ). Results showed that there was no significant difference in the mYAPS and PHBQ scores. However, it was shown that the number of children who were anxious preoperatively in the group that received hypnosis. The study concluded that hypnosis serves as an effective intervention to reduce preoperative anxiety in pediatric patients (Calipel, Lucas-Polomeni, Wodey, Ecoffey, 2005). In evaluating the study, both accuracy and generalizability of results serve as criteria for research validity. A valid study exercises reliability, internal validity, measurement validity, and external validity (Gliner Morgan, 2009). The overall validity of the study is supported by the credentials of the authors who are all medical doctors and its quantitative study design. The external validity of the study is affected by the number of samples or population used, in this case, a small sample size of 50. The internal validity of the study is affected by the equivalence of population groups, in this case, two similar groups of pediatric patients aged 2-11 years old. The study has a small sample size which is its weak point. However, it utilized equivalent population groups (two groups with similar characteristics) of pediatric patients which is the studys strong point for validity (Gliner Morgan, 2009). References Arizona State University. (n. d. ). PICO(T) form. Retrieved May 12, 2010, from http://nursingandhealth. asu. edu/evidence-based-practice/pico. htm Calipel, S. , Lucas-Polomeni, M. M. , Wodey, E. , Ecoffey, C. (2005). Premedication in children: Hypnosis versus midazolam. Pediatric Anaesthesia, 15(4), 275-281. Retrieved from http://www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/pubmed/15787917. Gliner, J. A. , Morgan, G. A. (2009). Research methods in applied settings: An integrated approach to design and analysis. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved from http://books. google. com/books? id=NuHHvAbTkf8Cprintsec=frontcover#v=onepageqf=false WCSU Libraries. (n. d. ) Introducing PICOT. Retrieved May 12, 2010, from http://library. wcsu. edu/web/assistance/research/nursing/tutorial/c_picot/? x=41y=51

Friday, March 6, 2020

Free Essays on There Should Have Been A Warning

Tsunamis are rare in the Indian Ocean, which has no system for detecting then and alerting those in danger. Scientists do not have the equipment to tell when an earthquake has created a tsunami. The first notice of the earthquake that anyone at the Pacific Tsunami Center received was a computer-generated image set off by seismic sensors at 2:59 p.m. on Saturday. Hawaii has warning sirens, and the weather radio network of oceanographic administration to carry tsunami warnings. Any country that has experienced a tsunami recently or that may be hit by one need some kind of warning system to protect their people. Although Sri Lanka is not part of the Pacific tsunami warning system, some officials at the Hawaii station were informed that a tsunami could be developing. The officials then sent a message to Sarath Weerawatnakula, the director of Sri Lanka’s Geological Survey and Mines Bureau. Weerawarnakula said that his organization received an alert from â€Å"international bodies† about the quake. He also stated that it took time to decipher the meaning of the message, and then it was too late to get out a signal. He said that sometimes warnings could be made, but not this time. There is no reason why someone could warn for one tsunami, but not the next one. Even if the signal is late, at least some people will be able to get away. The citizens of Sri Lanka have the right to know that a tsunami is coming; the officials should not hold this information from them. A summit has not decided to create a tsunami early warning system for the Indian Ocean. The high-tech equipment could detect tsunamis that are still miles out at sea. The system works in a simple way. A pressure sensor sits on the bottom of the ocean and measures the weight of the water above it. If a tsunami passes overhead, the pressure increases and the sensor sends a signal to a buoy that is sitting on the sea surface. The buoy then sends a signal to a satellite, which alert... Free Essays on There Should Have Been A Warning Free Essays on There Should Have Been A Warning Tsunamis are rare in the Indian Ocean, which has no system for detecting then and alerting those in danger. Scientists do not have the equipment to tell when an earthquake has created a tsunami. The first notice of the earthquake that anyone at the Pacific Tsunami Center received was a computer-generated image set off by seismic sensors at 2:59 p.m. on Saturday. Hawaii has warning sirens, and the weather radio network of oceanographic administration to carry tsunami warnings. Any country that has experienced a tsunami recently or that may be hit by one need some kind of warning system to protect their people. Although Sri Lanka is not part of the Pacific tsunami warning system, some officials at the Hawaii station were informed that a tsunami could be developing. The officials then sent a message to Sarath Weerawatnakula, the director of Sri Lanka’s Geological Survey and Mines Bureau. Weerawarnakula said that his organization received an alert from â€Å"international bodies† about the quake. He also stated that it took time to decipher the meaning of the message, and then it was too late to get out a signal. He said that sometimes warnings could be made, but not this time. There is no reason why someone could warn for one tsunami, but not the next one. Even if the signal is late, at least some people will be able to get away. The citizens of Sri Lanka have the right to know that a tsunami is coming; the officials should not hold this information from them. A summit has not decided to create a tsunami early warning system for the Indian Ocean. The high-tech equipment could detect tsunamis that are still miles out at sea. The system works in a simple way. A pressure sensor sits on the bottom of the ocean and measures the weight of the water above it. If a tsunami passes overhead, the pressure increases and the sensor sends a signal to a buoy that is sitting on the sea surface. The buoy then sends a signal to a satellite, which alert...